What is compliance? Some of you might be acutely aware of this term, and others might have little to no idea. In broad terms, business compliance means following the rules required to secure your business and the people that interact with it. More specifically, compliance is aimed at information security. Business Compliance means you are complying with requirements by a credible organization or government department that promotes the security and protection of sensitive information.

Read More

Once you’ve decided to work remotely, you may find it difficult to stay in sync with the rest of your team back in the office.  Digital workforce infrastructure has been engineered for decades to provide a stable foundation for your office, but now that you’re outside of your firewall you may find yourself as frustrated as a hacker would be when trying to access your company’s documents.  While you may still be able to email back and forth with your coworkers, you can’t easily update your shared files, see who’s available to receive an incoming call, or update a customer’s order status.

Read More

Working remotely may seem rather quick and easy. You head on over to your local coffee shop, order your triple-shot, half-caff, no foam, extra hot latte and sit at your favorite table in the corner.  You double check to make sure no one is looking over your shoulder, pop open your laptop and get to work. Right? Well, it’s actually a little more complicated than that. Staying secure in a non-secure work place comes with some much needed extra steps to keep your company data away from prying eyes.

Read More

So, now that you’ve made the decision to switch to VoIP, you’ll need to compare the details of your current phone configuration with the new phone configuration.  Here are a few of the key issues to address with your vendor:

Connection Type

While a coax connection has always been the less expensive route, fiber has come a long way in lowering its costs. If you’re in the Central Texas area, coax connections have become saturated.  The more Austin grows, the more businesses are adding Internet.  That amount continues to be shared across the city, but with more and more users.  Since this is NOT a dedicated (to you) connection, this can cause Internet traffic to slow and potentially make your VoIP connection less clear. With hosted VoIP, you will want your connection to your host smooth and fast.  Remember, hosted providers can boast about their connection and multisite locations as a sellingpoint, but it is only as fast and as efficient as the connection YOU are using to get there!

Read More

Last week we covered all the things you need to worry about if you move your system to the cloud, Will the Cloud Still Be Your Friend On A Rainy Day?. This week we’re focusing on moving your phone system to the cloud.

Although moving your phone services to the cloud may seem like a slam dunk, there are many pitfalls that you need to be aware of. This is because the technology that hosted phone systems rely on, Voice over IP, is one of the most complex and most sensitive technologies currently available.

Read More

What is “the cloud?” This is certainly a question you’ve asked or wondered. You may have received a few explanations too. When searching online, the first resulting definition used the words “Paradigm” and “Ubiquitous” … this does not clear things up for me. Let’s take care of that. If you’ve hear about “the cloud” you’ve likely heard the phrase “on premise” as well. If not, that’s ok. Defining both will help understanding each of them. So what exactly do those terms mean?  Simple.  Cloud vs On Premises is where your data is stored or resides.  On premises data is housed locally in an environment that you (or your trusted IT vendor) maintain.  Data is on your computers or servers and is easily accessible.  Cloud is similar to its name.  Data in the cloud resides offsite, somewhere outside of your home or office. Typically it is on a server, in a data center, miles away from you. Cloud data is accessible to you via a web browser or application.

Read More



Ok, I have followed all the steps in last week’s blog post. I have identified my critical functions and reviewed my backups, but I still don’t have a recovery plan in place.

How do I create a plan based on the loss tolerance decisions that have been made?

Now that you’ve done some research and made critical business decisions that best fit your Disaster Recovery needs, let’s document it! You can simultaneously begin to implement some of the changes you will need to engage your plan when disaster strikes, but if there is no user manual then no one will know how to use it. You want to create a write-up that is comprehensive and easy to understand and to follow. At a high level, you want to make sure your plan covers the Who, What, When, Where, Why & How?

Read More


Disaster Recovery – what does it mean to your business? Heck, what does it even mean in general, and do you have to do something about it?

One of the more popular business-critical terms you might have heard before is Disaster Recovery (DR). The term Disaster Recovery first started floating around business communities in the 1970’s when organizations began to realize their dependence on computer systems and technology could potentially be harmful to their viability if they didn’t have a plan to address a system outage. So, what exactly does DR mean and how critical is it in the modern business? Let’s break down the terms.

Read More