Last week we talked about the importance of keeping your machines upgraded on scheduled intervals. This not only helps your company save time and money, but also keeps your employees happy with efficiently running machines. While this does help keep your company functioning smoothly, what would happen if a disaster were to strike and take down all businesscritical devices or software? Could you say at this very moment that you are prepared for a disaster? 

Read More

By now you should have trained your employees on what an attack might look like. Now what? Training an employee is half the battle. Not only do they need to know what NOT to do, they need to know what TO DO when a challenge presents itself.  Next, employees need to be aware of internal changes that could directly impact them or their environment, and what to do in case your company does fall victim to an attack. One might call this a Security Plan… 

Read More

Last week we discussed the consequences of allowing your systems to pass their end of life and continuing to use them. One of the larger issues is the increased potential of malware on your machines. Not only can this affect your desktops, but it can spread to the whole network. With malware attacks not slowing down, is this really a chance you can afford to take?

Read More

Over the past few weeks we’ve been talking about the importance of upgrading your near EOL, or end of life, systems. While it’s important to know that not replacing these machines can slow down your network, let’s talk about how it could leave your network open to malware and overall vulnerabilities 

Read More

Microsoft Office 365 is a cloud-based subscription model that offers email and office productivity solutions that many are finding attractive. Business applications from Outlook to Excel is accessible anywhere you have an internet connection on multiple devices, depending on the plan you pick. Traditional Microsoft Office applications were only utilized through desktop installations, limiting access to your productivity environment.

UniVista offers three of the most popular licenses within O365, Business Essentials, Business Premium and Enterprise E3.

Read More

Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS)

Criminal Justice Information Services, or CJIS, is a division of the FBI that provides criminal justice information needed to perform law enforcement duties. It “serve[s] as the focal point and central repository for criminal justice information services in the FBI.” – FBI. In Texas this information is disseminated via the DPS and includes details such as vehicle registration, criminal history, driver’s license, license plate, firearm, etc. Because this information is highly sensitive and needs to be protected, CJIS provides security compliance requirements and performs audits to ensure these requirements are being met. Below are just a few example requirements of the Security Policy…

  • Security Awareness Training
  • Perimeter Intrusion Detection
  • Advanced Authentication
  • Maintain Log History
  • Change Management
  • Device Encryption

Failing a single audit flags an agency as non-compliant. If compliance is not achieved, the agency can lose access to the information and tools needed to perform their duties.

Read More

Ah Budgeting… The least favorite thing we can do in both our personal and business lives.  Although it isn’t fun, it tends to make our lives much easier in the long run.  Let’s break down the basics to getting you and your organization onto a budget plan that will work for your business goals.

Read More

Working remotely may seem rather quick and easy. You head on over to your local coffee shop, order your triple-shot, half-caff, no foam, extra hot latte and sit at your favorite table in the corner.  You double check to make sure no one is looking over your shoulder, pop open your laptop and get to work. Right? Well, it’s actually a little more complicated than that. Staying secure in a non-secure work place comes with some much needed extra steps to keep your company data away from prying eyes.

Read More

In our last post we talked about the Pros and Cons of moving your systems to the cloud vs. keeping them in your office.

As you can see, it can really be a toss-up. Some systems are better kept at your office and some should be moved to the cloud. It really depends on your business’s current and future needs.

Read More

What is “the cloud?” This is certainly a question you’ve asked or wondered. You may have received a few explanations too. When searching online, the first resulting definition used the words “Paradigm” and “Ubiquitous” … this does not clear things up for me. Let’s take care of that. If you’ve hear about “the cloud” you’ve likely heard the phrase “on premise” as well. If not, that’s ok. Defining both will help understanding each of them. So what exactly do those terms mean?  Simple.  Cloud vs On Premises is where your data is stored or resides.  On premises data is housed locally in an environment that you (or your trusted IT vendor) maintain.  Data is on your computers or servers and is easily accessible.  Cloud is similar to its name.  Data in the cloud resides offsite, somewhere outside of your home or office. Typically it is on a server, in a data center, miles away from you. Cloud data is accessible to you via a web browser or application.

Read More